Russian influence operations in Canada

Canada United States Christopher Andrew (historian)

Russian influence operations in Canada are clandestine operations conducted by Russian government and government-affiliated entities against Canada.

Terrorism

According to Christopher Andrew's and Vasili Mitrokhin's book based on the Mitrokhin archive, the USSR's KGB probably established contact with Canadian terrorist group Front de libération du Québec (FLQ).[1]

The KGB was concerned that FLQ's terrorist attacks could be linked to the Soviet Union. It designed a disinformation campaign and forged documents to portray FLQ as a CIA false flag operation. A photocopy of the forged "CIA document" was "leaked" to Montreal Star in September 1971. The operation was so successful that Canada's Prime Minister believed that CIA had conducted operations in Canada. The story was still quoted in the 1990s, even among academic authors.[2]

Use of Canadian passports

The Soviet government used Canada's warm relationship with the Soviet Union to cultivate a hospitable training ground for Soviet spies, who would later operate as deep-cover agents inside the United States. Young KGB candidates would be inserted into prestigious universities, such as McGill, where they would learn English under a new identity, then begin their journey to operate southbound.[3] Russian government agents have a record of using Canadian passports and identities,[4][5] as, in recent history, evidenced by the cases of 'Paul Hampel' (2006)[6] and some members of the group of Russian sleeper agents ("Illegals Program") arrested in the US June 2010.[7]

References

  1. ^ Andrew, Christopher, Vasili Mitrokhin (2000). The Sword and the Shield: The Mitrokhin Archive and the Secret History of the KGB. Basic Books. ISBN 0-465-00312-5. p. 378
  2. ^ Andrew, Christopher, Vasili Mitrokhin (2000). The Sword and the Shield: The Mitrokhin Archive and the Secret History of the KGB. Basic Books. ISBN 0-465-00312-5. p. 378
  3. ^ the-russian-spies-who-raised-us: US. Macleans
  4. ^ Above the Tearline: Spies and Canadian Passports Archived 2010-07-12 at the Wayback Machine. Stratfor. July 8, 2010
  5. ^ Russian Spies Are Alive, Well Insight on the News, March 8, 1999 by J. Michael Waller
  6. ^ Canada cites IWP professor to help deport Russian spy November 28, 2006.
  7. ^ Alleged Russian spies posed as Canadians in bid to penetrate Washington: US. The Canadian Press