Oronzo Reale

Aldo Moro Emilio Colombo Italian Republican Party
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Oronzo Reale
Oronzo Reale.jpg
Minister of Justice
In office
23 November 1974 – 12 February 1976
Prime MinisterAldo Moro
Preceded byMario Zagari
Succeeded byFrancesco Paolo Bonifacio
In office
27 March 1970 – 6 March 1971
Prime MinisterMariano Rumor
Emilio Colombo
Preceded bySilvio Gava
Succeeded byEmilio Colombo
In office
4 December 1963 – 24 June 1968
Prime MinisterAldo Moro
Preceded byGiacinto Bosco
Succeeded byGuido Gonella
Personal details
Born(1902-10-24)24 October 1902
Lecce
Died14 July 1988(1988-07-14) (aged 85)
Rome
NationalityItalian
Political partyItalian Republican Party

Oronzo Reale (24 October 1902 – 14 July 1988)[1] was an Italian politician, who served as justice minister in the 1960s and 1970s.

Biography

Reale was born in 1902.[2]

Reale was a member and the head of the Republican Party.[3][4] He served as the secretary of the party.[5] In the 1970s he tried the French model to reorganize the party for which he set up a committee.[6]

Reale also assumed cabinet posts. On 4 December 1963, he became justice minister of Italy.[2] He was reappointed justice minister to the coalition government led by prime minister Aldo Moro on 24 February 1966.[7] His term lasted until 24 June 1968.[2] Then Reale served as finance minister from 12 December 1968 to 5 August 1969.[2]

He was secondly appointed justice minister on 27 March 1970.[2] His term ended in March 1971.[4] His third and last term as justice minister was from 23 November 1974 to 12 February 1976.[2] During his third term as justice minister, Reale developed a public law order, called Legge Reale or more formally public law order 152, and introduced it on 22 May 1975 as a response to bombings organized by right-wing groups in Brescia.[8] It expanded the powers of Italian security forces.[8][9]

Reale died on 14 July 1988, aged 85.[2]

References

  1. ^ http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/oronzo-reale_(Dizionario-Biografico)/
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Italian ministries". Rulers. Retrieved 19 April 2013.
  3. ^ "Small party quits Italy coalition". The Pittsburgh Press. Rome. UPI. 28 February 1971. Retrieved 19 April 2013.
  4. ^ a b Robb, Inez (2 July 1963). "Romans talked dryly with JFK spy case forces". The Pittsburgh Press. Retrieved 19 April 2013.
  5. ^ Norman Kogan (1963). The Politics of Italian Foreign Policy. New York: Praeger. Retrieved 3 January 2014. – via Questia (subscription required)
  6. ^ Leonard Weinberg (1995). The transformation of Italian communism. Transaction Publishers. p. 33. ISBN 978-1-4128-4030-9. Retrieved 27 April 2013.
  7. ^ "Italian crisis ends under new coalition". The Montreal Gazette. Rome. Reuters. 24 February 1966. Retrieved 19 April 2013.
  8. ^ a b Richard L. Clutterbuck (1990). Terrorism, Drugs, and Crime in Europe: After 1992. Routledge. p. 31. ISBN 978-0-415-05443-0. Retrieved 19 April 2013.
  9. ^ Paul Wilkinson (28 January 2011). Terrorism Versus Democracy: The Liberal State Response. Taylor & Francis. p. 80. ISBN 978-1-136-83546-9. Retrieved 19 April 2013.