Milton (electoral district)

Conservative Party of Canada Liberal Party of Canada Niagara Centre
Milton
Ontario electoral district
Milton, riding 2015.svg
Milton in relation to nearby electoral districts in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area
Federal electoral district
LegislatureHouse of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Adam van Koeverden
Liberal
District created2013
First contested2015
Last contested2019
District webpageprofile, map
Demographics
Population (2016)[1]114,093
Electors (2015)70,430
Area (km²)[1]447
Pop. density (per km²)255.2
Census divisionsHalton
Census subdivisionsBurlington, Milton

Milton is a federal electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that consists of the town of Milton and part of Burlington which has a population growing much faster than the Ontario average. It was created by the 2012 federal redistribution and previously part of Halton. Redistributed results showed that Conservative Lisa Raitt won the area easily in 2011, although her vote share dropped in the 2015 election and the Liberals took the riding in 2019. Since 2019 it has been represented by Liberal Adam van Koeverden.

Profile

The riding (electoral district) in its current form consists of the part of Burlington north of Dundas Street and Highway 407 and the town of Milton.[2] The eponymous town, which makes up much of the riding's area, is a quickly-growing settlement which dates back to the 1820s.[2][3][4] According to the 2016 Census, the population of the riding grew over six times as much as the Ontario average between 2011 and 2016, from 88,065 to 114,093 (a 29.6% increase compared to the provincial average of 4.6%).[1] Over a third of the riding's population are immigrants. In 2015, the median income in the riding was $42,779, up from $41,801 in 2010.[1][5] The median age in the district is 36, below the Ontario average of 41.[1]

History

Lisa Raitt
Adam van Koeverden

The district was first proposed as part of the 2012 redistribution. It was initially proposed to consist of Milton, the rural northern part of Burlington, and some small suburban areas of Burlington.[6] There was some concern that the growth of Milton would cause it to be seriously underrepresented by 2031.[7] Before the public meetings were scheduled to be held, the commission redrew the districts in the area and the district would now be split. Burlington North—Milton South would consist of southern Milton and a few more suburban neighbourhoods in Burlington. In the north, it would be combined with Halton Hills to form Halton Hills—Milton.[8]

In February 2013, the district was reverted back to the original proposal, but with the northern suburbs of Burlington excluded.[9] This proposal ended up being approved.[10] The area of this district was previously part of Halton and had a population of 88,065, 17% below the provincial average.[9][11][12]

In the 2011 election, Conservative MP Lisa Raitt won Halton by about 29% of the vote, and when redistributed, she won Milton by 31%.[13][14] In the 2015 election, her margin of victory over the Liberal candidate declined to 5%.[15] Shortly after the election, Raitt was appointed to the Shadow Cabinet as Finance critic.[16] After Raitt spent time outside of the shadow cabinet during her leadership bid, she was appointed Deputy Leader of the Conservative Party in 2017.[17][18]

In January 2019, the Liberals nominated former Olympian Adam van Koeverden to run in the riding.[19] A riding poll was released in the lead-up to the election showing a tight race, and it was expected that it would turn out that way on election night.[20] Despite this, van Koeverden won the riding's seat in Parliament against Raitt by 15% of the vote and won a majority of votes in the riding.[21]

Members of Parliament

This riding has elected the following Members of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
Milton
Riding created from Halton
42nd  2015–2019     Lisa Raitt Conservative
43rd  2019–present     Adam van Koeverden Liberal

Election results

Graph of election results in Milton (minor parties that never got 2% of the vote or didn't run consistently are omitted)
2019 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Adam van Koeverden 30,882 51.70 +11.26 $109,480.90
Conservative Lisa Raitt 21,564 36.10 -9.28 $79,176.58
New Democratic Farina Hassan 3,851 6.50 -4.38 none listed
Green Eleanor Hayward 2,769 4.60 +2.31 $11,179.13
People's Percy Dastur 613 1.00 - none listed
Total valid votes/Expense limit 59,679 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 379
Turnout 60,058 70.81
Eligible voters 84,806
Source: Elections Canada[22][23]
2015 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Lisa Raitt 22,378 45.38 -9.67 $102,240.41
Liberal Azim Rizvee 19,940 40.44 +16.26 $120,826.89
New Democratic Alex Anabusi 5,366 10.88 -5.65 $6,027.16
Green Mini Batra 1,131 2.29 -1.58 $2,700.16
Libertarian Chris Jewell 493 1.00 $2,322.98
Total valid votes/Expense limit 49,308 100.00   $204,958.27
Total rejected ballots 210 0.42
Turnout 49,518 69.01
Eligible voters 71,754
Conservative hold Swing -12.96
Source: Elections Canada[24][25][15]
2011 federal election redistributed results[14]
Party Vote %
  Conservative 18,631 55.05
  Liberal 8,183 24.18
  New Democratic 5,593 16.53
  Green 1,311 3.87
  Others 126 0.37

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Census Profile, 2016 Census". statcan.gc.ca. Statistics Canada. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Voter Information Service - Map (Milton)". elections.ca. Elections Canada. Retrieved June 22, 2020.
  3. ^ "Census Profile, 2016 Census". statcan.gc.ca. Statistics Canada. 2016. Retrieved June 22, 2020.
  4. ^ "A Brief History of Milton". Milton Historical Society. Retrieved June 22, 2020.
  5. ^ "NHS Profile, Milton, Ontario, 2011". statcan.gc.ca. Statistics Canada. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  6. ^ Ontario Electoral Redistribution Commission (2012). "Proposed Boundaries – Ontario". 2012 federal electoral redistribution. Archived from the original on December 11, 2017. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  7. ^ "Milton should have its own electoral district: resident". InsideHalton.com. Torstar. Metroland Media. November 7, 2012. Archived from the original on June 9, 2020. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  8. ^ Ontario Electoral Redistribution Commission (2012). "Proposed Boundaries – Ontario: Additional Changes". 2012 federal electoral redistribution. Archived from the original on January 31, 2018. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  9. ^ a b Ontario Electoral Redistribution Commission (February 14, 2013). "Milton – Commission's Report". 2012 federal electoral redistribution. Archived from the original on December 11, 2017. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  10. ^ Ontario Electoral Redistribution Commission (2013). "9BurlingtonOakville" (PDF). 2012 electoral redistribution commission. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 11, 2017. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  11. ^ "Halton – Historical data". elections.ca. Elections Canada. Archived from the original on June 12, 2019. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  12. ^ Ontario Electoral Redistribution Commission (July 31, 2013). "Part II – Amendments to the Initial Report (July 31 2013) – Ontario – Schedule A - Redistribution Federal Electoral Districts". 2012 federal electoral redistribution. Archived from the original on December 11, 2017. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  13. ^ "FORTY-FIRST GENERAL ELECTION 2011 — Poll-by-poll results". elections.ca. Elections Canada. 2011. Archived from the original on June 9, 2020. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  14. ^ a b "Milton, ON (2013 Rep. Order)". Pundit's Guide to Canadian Elections. Archived from the original on October 21, 2015. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  15. ^ a b "FORTY-SECOND GENERAL ELECTION 2015 — Poll-by-poll results: Milton". elections.ca. Elections Canada. 2015. Archived from the original on January 25, 2020. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  16. ^ Tasker, John Paul (November 20, 2015). "Interim Conservative Leader Rona Ambrose taps women for top shadow cabinet jobs". CBC News. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on December 13, 2015. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  17. ^ Oct 16, Beatrice Britneff Published on (October 16, 2016). "Conservative Party announces new shadow cabinet". iPolitics. Archived from the original on November 7, 2017. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  18. ^ Stone, Laura (July 21, 2017). "As Conservative Party deputy leader, Lisa Raitt hopes women will 'see themselves' in her". The Globe and Mail. Archived from the original on July 28, 2017. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  19. ^ LeBlanc, Steve (January 20, 2019). "UPDATE: Milton Liberals have Olympic flag-bearer". InsideHalton.com. Torstar. Metroland Media. Archived from the original on February 3, 2019. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  20. ^ Loriggi, Paola (October 19, 2019). "Ontario's Milton riding poised to be a nailbiter as high-profile candidates face off". Global News. Corus Entertainment. Archived from the original on June 22, 2020. Retrieved June 22, 2020.
  21. ^ "FORTY-THIRD GENERAL ELECTION 2019 — Poll-by-poll results: Milton". elections.ca. Elections Canada. April 6, 2020. Archived from the original on April 24, 2020. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  22. ^ "List of confirmed candidates". Elections Canada. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  23. ^ "Election Night Results". Elections Canada. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  24. ^ Elections Canada – Confirmed candidates for Milton, 30 September 2015
  25. ^ Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates Archived 2016-03-04 at the Wayback Machine