Janice Charette

Norman Robertson Justin Trudeau Michael Wernick

Janice Charette
Janice Charette in London in 2019
Charette in 2019
Canadian High Commissioner to the United Kingdom
Assumed office
July 19, 2016
MonarchElizabeth II
Prime MinisterJustin Trudeau
Preceded byGordon Campbell
Clerk of the Privy Council and Secretary to the Cabinet
In office
October 6, 2014 – January 21, 2016
Prime MinisterStephen Harper
Justin Trudeau
Preceded byWayne Wouters
Succeeded byMichael Wernick
Deputy Clerk of the Privy Council and Associate Secretary to the Cabinet
In office
January 22, 2013 – October 5, 2014
Associate Secretary to the Cabinet and Deputy Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs
In office
November 15, 2010 – January 20, 2013
Deputy Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development
In office
July 2006 – July 2010
Deputy Minister of Citizenship and Immigration
In office
2004–2006
Personal details
BornOttawa, Ontario, Canada
CitizenshipCanada
NationalityCanadian
Spouse(s)Reg Charette
Alma materCarleton University
OccupationCivil Servant

Janice Charette is a Canadian public servant and the current Canadian High Commissioner to the United Kingdom. She previously served as the Clerk of the Privy Council and Secretary to the Cabinet.

She has been recognized as one of Canada’s Top 100 Most Powerful Women in 2013, 2014, and 2015.[1]

Personal Life

Born and raised in Ottawa, Ontario,[2] Charette attended Carleton University, where she completed a Bachelor of Commerce degree. Charette is married to Reg Charette (who has been referred to as "His Excellency").[1][3] Together they have two adult children, Jed and Cassie. [1]

Career

Charette joined the public service in 1984, working in the Department of Finance.[4]

She served as the deputy minister (the highest unelected position) of Citizenship and Immigration Canada from 2004 until 2006, and as the deputy minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada from 2006 until 2010.[4]

Charette was appointed as the Clerk of the Privy Council and Secretary to the Cabinet on August 20, 2014, when the Prime Minister at that time, Stephen Harper, announced that she would replace Wayne Wouters, the Clerk of the Privy Council from 2009 to 2014.[6] She is the second woman to have held that post, which is the top civil service position in Canada and the highest unelected position.

On January 22, 2016, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that Michael Wernick would replace Charette as Clerk of the Privy Council. On July 19, 2016, she was officially appointed as the Canadian High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, the first women to hold the role. [7][8][9] This was widely seen as a demotion, "after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau abruptly removed Ms. Charette as the country's top bureaucrat shortly after taking power."[10]

Volunteer Work

Charette is a member of the board of directors of Royal Ottawa Healthcare Group and on the advisory board of the School of Policy Studies at Queen’s University. [11]

In 2008, she was national Chair for the United Way’s Government of Canada Workplace Charitable Campaign, raising over CAD$136 million for communities and national health charities across Canada. [1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Government of Canada, Global Affairs Canada (2009-06-25). "Biography of HE Mrs. JANICE CHARETTE High Commissioner for Canada in the United Kingdom for Great Britain and Northern Ireland and Permanent Representative of Canada to the International Maritime Organisation". www.canadainternational.gc.ca. Retrieved 2020-09-01.
  2. ^ http://www.diplomatmagazine.com/heads-of-mission/north-america/canada/
  3. ^ "https://twitter.com/jillvardy/status/1105124217358635009". Twitter. Retrieved 2020-09-01. External link in |title= (help)
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Background: Janice Charette, Canada's next Clerk of the Privy Council". Ottawa Citizen. 20 August 2014. Retrieved 20 August 2014.
  5. ^ "Mrs Janice Charette - Deputy Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada - OECD". www.oecd.org. Retrieved 2020-09-02.
  6. ^ "PM announces appointment of Janice Charette as Clerk of the Privy Council". Prime Minister of Canada. 20 August 2014. Archived from the original on 21 August 2014. Retrieved 20 August 2014.
  7. ^ "Dion shakes up diplomatic ranks, replaces controversial Tory appointees". The Globe and Mail, July 19, 2016.
  8. ^ "Diplomatic appointments". Global Affairs Canada. 2016-07-19. Archived from the original on 2016-07-20.
  9. ^ "Diplomatic Life". Publishing Business. Retrieved 2020-09-02.
  10. ^ "Dion shuffles diplomatic ranks, replaces controversial Tory appointees". Retrieved 2020-09-01.
  11. ^ "Top 100 Most Powerful Women in Canada: Public Sector Leaders". Financial Post. Retrieved 2020-09-02.