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Diego Echavarría Misas

Itagüí Wayback Machine Medellín
Diego Echavarría Misas
Bust of Diego Echavarría Misas, located in the main square of the city of Itagui, Colombia.
Bust of Diego Echavarría Misas, located in the main square of the city of Itagui, Colombia.
Personal details
Born(1895-09-28)28 September 1895
Itagüí, Colombia
Died(1971-09-19)19 September 1971
Medellín, Colombia
Spouse(s)Benedikta Zur Nieden
ChildrenIsolda Echavarría
Alma materCollege Pedagogium of Bad Godesberg
ProfessionEntrepreneur

Diego Echavarría Misas (28 September 1895 in Itagüí – 19 September 1971 in Medellín) was a prominent businessman philanthropist who donated much of his money to the municipalities of the Aburrá Valley, especially Itagüí City.[1]

Life

Diego was the son of Alejandro Echavarria Isaza, originally from Barbosa, and Ana Josefa Misas Euse. At 16 he was sent to Germany, where he attended high school in the Paedagogium in Bad Godesberg, near Bonn. Thereafter, he traveled through various parts of Europe, visiting regularly to Medellin, where he initially worked with his father. He settled in Paris.

Achievements

Later he married the German Benedikta (Dita) Zur Nieden, and decided to settle in Itagüí.[2] In 1970 he donated a [[[[large batch of home in Itagüí to build a school in the neighborhood of Santa Ana, who called Isolda Echavarria in memory of Diego's only daughter, died in the United States where he attended his university studies because of a rare disease.]]] With the heritage of his family, Diego created a Foundation for Education and Charitable Works, built the residence Isolda Echavarria in the Pedregal neighborhood; center that provides practical education and medical care to people living nearby. Almost daily up to monitor the work of the construction and later operation.

Upon his death, his wife Dita donated their Medellín home, known as "El Castillo" because it resembled a Bavarian castle, to a foundation, which still operates it as a cultural center open to the public.

Death

He was kidnapped and one month later killed on September 19, 1971 by "El Mono" Trejos, leader of a gang in Medellín.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Itagüí Archived August 9, 2011, at the Wayback Machine," Itagüí City. Web, Sep. 11, 2010.
  2. ^ "Itagüí Archived August 9, 2011, at the Wayback Machine," Itagüí City. Web, Apr. 16, 2009.