Arthur Edward Blanchette

The Leader-Post International Control Commission Organization of American States

Arthur Edward Blanchette (March 23, 1921 - August 30, 2003) was a Canadian diplomat.[1][2] Born in Hartford, Connecticut, he graduated from the University of Montreal in 1940 and took his PhD in 1945 in Ottawa where he entered in the Latin-American section of the Wartime information board. In 1969 he was at the Direction between francophone countries. He was Chargé d'Affaires to Egypt then Acting High Commissioner to South Africa followed by Acting Commissioner at the ICSC for Cambodia, then Chargé d'Affaires a.i. to Greece before returning home to a post in the department of francophone countries at External Affairs in Ottawa. Then Ambassador and Permanent Observer to the Organization of American States[3] then to Tunisia,[4] and, after an extended impasse, non-resident ambassador to Libya.[5]

After retiring from foreign service, Blanchette became director of the historical division of the Department of External Affairs. He caused some controversy in 1983 due to a book he was preparing on the department's history. Some figures who appeared in the proposed book, including former External Affairs minister and future Prime Minister, Paul Martin, objected to its content.[6]

Blanchette was the editor of two volumes of speeches and papers entitled Canadian Foreign Policy.[7][8]

Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Established
Chargé d'Affaires a.i. to Egypt
1954–
Succeeded by
Kenneth Porter Kirkwood
Preceded by
Evan William Thistle Gill
Acting High Commissioner to South Africa
1957–1958
Succeeded by
James Joseph Hurley
Preceded by
Eric Herbert Gilmour
Acting Commissioner to ICSC for Cambodia
1958–1959
Succeeded by
D'Iberville Fortier
Preceded by
Hon. Antonio Barrette
Chargé d'Affaires a.i. to Greece
1966–1967
Succeeded by
Herbert Frederick Brooks-Hill Feaver
Preceded by
Michel Antonin Careau
Ambassador and Permanent Observer to the Organization of American States
1976–1980
Succeeded by
Kenneth Bryce Williamson
Preceded by
Jean-Marcel Touchette
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Tunisia
1980–1983
Succeeded by
Witold Maciej Weynerowski
Preceded by
Michael Charles Temple
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Libya
1982–1983
Succeeded by
Witold Maciej Weynerowski

References

  1. ^ "Arthur Blanchette". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 10 April 2017.
  2. ^ "Canada appoints new ambassadors". The Leader-Post. Canadian Press. 27 May 1976. p. 12. Retrieved 8 April 2013.
  3. ^ "OAS charter changes could be for Canada's benefit". Calgary Herald. Canadian Press. 12 July 1978. pp. A13. Retrieved 8 April 2013.
  4. ^ "Article". International Canada. 11-12: 177. 1980.
  5. ^ Best, Patrick (2 May 1984). "Canada's Libyan relations scutinized after London embassy siege". Ottawa Citizen. p. 79. Retrieved 8 April 2013.
  6. ^ Best, John (16 November 1983). "External Affairs memoirs causing internal controversy". The Leader-Post. p. A6. Retrieved 8 April 2013.
  7. ^ Blanchette, Arthur E., ed. (1994). Canadian Foreign Policy, 1977-1992. McGill-Queen's Press. ISBN 9780886292430.
  8. ^ Blanchette, Arthur E., ed. (2000). Canadian Foreign Policy, 1945-2000. Dundurn. ISBN 9780919614895.